Teaching Nutrition

Teaching Nutrition

The Hands on Food lessons provide students with the opportunity to explore a variety of foods. Some foods may be new to them. Learning to eat a variety of foods is a skill developed over time. Some children approach new foods with enthusiasm while others may be hesitant or unwilling to try them. All of these responses are normal. It can take many exposures and positive experiences with a food to gain acceptance. It is important to make students feel comfortable when presented with the chance to try something new. Students should not be pressured to taste or eat the food they make; valuable learning happens during discussions and food preparation.

During food activities adults should refrain from labeling foods as ‘healthy’ or ‘unhealthy’ and instead talk about food in a neutral way, describing foods by attributes like color and texture. Instead of teaching about the nutrients in food, encourage exploring food with the senses and help students cultivate a positive relationship with food.

Check out the Teach Food First Guiding Principles to learn about best practices for food and nutrition education. You will also find information about:

Visit the Vancouver Coastal Health site for more information about Supporting Healthy Eating at School.